Tag Archives: blog

A free social media strategy for your business

20 Dec

Building a social media programme is easier than it sounds

I was talking casually to a business owner the other day about what he could get out of social media.

It occurred to me afterwards that the advice I gave him is relevant to you too whether you are small, medium or humungous; whether you sell shark tanks, speech therapy or bleach.

So here’s the beginnings of a plan for your business – base your programme or strategy on this and contact me on Twitter or in the comments if I can be of further help. If this is useful, all I ask in return is that you ‘retweet’ the post or share it in your preferred way. Continue reading

Advertisements

People don’t buy what you do – they buy why you do it.

9 Nov

I’m sorry – I should have told you about this ages ago.

Because it has the power to change entirely the way you want the world to see you.

If you run a business – in fact if you’re selling anything; a political message, poetry, a marriage proposal or your gardening skills – I implore you to set aside 18 minutes of your life to look at this talk by Simon Sinek, the slightly awkward but brilliant author of Start With Why.

These 18 magical, powerful, inspiring minutes get right to the nub of why some of us succeed in our communications and some of us fail.

Leaders, Sinek says, don’t start by telling you what they are doing, or how they are doing it. No, whether they are Martin Luther-King, Apple’s Steve Jobs or the Wright Brothers, they begin by telling you why they are doing it.

What does this mean for brands and how they position themselves in the marketplace?

It means this:

You should be communicating about what you are, not what you sell.

Or as Sinek so eloquently puts it:

“People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it”.

Five reasons why you should follow me on Twitter (and so should your friends)

8 Nov

1. You’re interested in the media, old and new, and that’s what I tweet about (most of the time)

2. I won’t automatically follow you back but you can bet your behind I’ll peruse your profile and if I like what I see, I’ll follow you back or at least observe you for a while before deciding whether I’m interested

3. I follow fewer than 300 people but they are some of the most thoughtful, engaging and entertaining thinkers in and around the media, whether they’re traditional journalists, politicians, bloggers or waspish commentators. I spend a lot of my time consuming and sharing their content, spreading their wisdom, passing on their jokes, retweeting their scurrilous gossip – and that will interest, educate and aid you. And when you share it, people will be interested in you.

4. I have only 343 followers but they are an active, infuential and engaged group. I have conversations with many of them and ignore none. Most are interested in what I say or spread – they read my tweets and I read theirs. It’s a community that contains some very talented well-followed individuals, like US marketing bloggers Mitch Joel, Mark Schaefer, Trey Pennington and Guy Kawasaki, like McDonald’s head of social media Rick Wion and like Amber Naslund, VP of social strategy at world-leading social media monitoring firm Radian6. So if I retweet your tweets and spread your content, you will reach my audience, my influential community. You could be part of that community today.

5. I’ll pay you. Okay, that’s not true. Nonetheless, click here to find me on Twitter and hit ‘follow’. It could be the start of something special. And if you like what you’ve read here, or think someone in your community might find it useful, hit the retweet button below.

Can we save local newspapers?

13 Oct

Can we save local newspapers?

I’m not going to answer that question.

Yet.

But politicians of all persuasions are certainly queuing up to tell us that we should try.

The demise of the local rag would be a tragedy, they say. We’d be losing a pillar of local democracy, they tell us. “My best mate’s a media baron, who’s going to help me stay in power,” they often add. Hang on, that last bit’s not right.

Meanwhile consumers of media are changing their habits at a frightening pace, largely at the expense of the Press.

I’m researching a blog for the near future on whether we should be concerned about the fact most local newspapers are haemmorhaging readers.

I want to know what, if anything, can be done about it and whether we should do anything about it.

If you’ve read your local paper and you’ve got a single idea about how it could adapt to the internet age – how it could improve so you’d be more inclined to buy it (or keep buying it) – I’d be really interested in your views

I’ve put some questions below to  prompt you but please feel free to rap freestyle, either in the comments section at the bottom of this post or by emailing me privately at michaeltaggart[at]yahoo[dot]co[dot]uk (I’ve written it like that to stop evil web spam robots taking my family hostage). Continue reading

Two blogs that prove there are no blogging rules

24 Sep

Marketing legend Seth Godin

Anyone who says there’s a rule book for good blogging is just plain wrong.

Two nuggets of pure gold from two pioneers of social media this week showed how utterly old-fashioned that idea is.

Both shared big and inspiring thoughts with their readers, yet there was a gaping chasm in their formats.

Step forward Seth Godin and Chris Brogan, whose postings this week – when juxtaposed side-by-side – show that even the most basic assumptions about blogging cannot be assumed. Continue reading

The most important ROI blog this year

21 Sep

Hours after blogging on social media return on investment (R.O.I.) last week, one of the most important blogs any of us have read on that topic popped into glorious existence.

Marketer Olivier Blanchard, who I mentioned in that blog, made a blistering attack on a story that had been doing the rounds on Mashable about McDonalds.  (*Pats himself on the back for precience but curses the relative inadequacy of his own offerings*)

I’ll post a link to Olivier’s blog in a second – but heres a VERY quick summary:

STEP 1: McDonald’s ‘social media director’ Rick Wion claims a Foursquare promotion by the burger chain increased footfall across America by 33%.

STEP 2: Mashable runs the story (allegedly) without questioning the improbable claim.

STEP 3: Olivier delivers a devastating wake up call to one of the world’s biggest, most famous brands. The searing anger at what he clearly views as an affront to his trade is palpable.

STEP 4. McDonald’s whimpers quietly

Anyway, I won’t spoil your fun – read the post, the update below it and, if you’ve got 10 more minutes, it’s well worth reading the lively debate below in the comments. I promise you’ll learn something.

If you’re not interested by all this social media blah, read the post anyway because it’s bloody entertaining.

And if you’re interested in the R.O.I. of social media, print it, frame it and put it on your office wall.

Here’s the link again – just in case you missed it. And here it is again – to make doubly sure you read it.

Enjoy!

Why we no longer need paper

1 Sep

What have Seth Godin, Laura Lippman, the Huffington Post and the Oxford English Dictionary got in common?

They say it’s not a crime to make a mistake.

Clearly that’s not always the case and so I prefer the faithful bed fellow of that phrase: “The real crime is the failure to learn from ones mistakes”.

Thus it was with an approving nod that I read at the weekend that the venerable Oxford Online Dictionary had announced its next edition might only be available online.

The current (and second) edition of the dictionary – 20 hefty volumes costing £750 ($1,165) – has been sold around 30,000 times since publication in 1989, mostly to obsessive bibliophiles and weird collectors.

The next edition will likely be read by a great many more people and will not be made of dead trees. In fact, the current digital version is already enjoying two million visits a month. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: